Persky recall effort has lots of cash compared to the judge’s allies - Recall Judge Aaron Persky

Persky recall effort has lots of cash compared to the judge’s allies

The campaign committee seeking to oust Santa Clara Superior Court Judge Aaron Persky continues to raise more money than the committee formed to retain him and has far more cash on hand, according to campaign finance documents filed this week.

 

 

 

The campaign committee seeking to oust Santa Clara Superior Court Judge Aaron Persky continues to raise more money than the committee formed to retain him and has far more cash on hand, according to campaign finance documents filed this week.

But the organizer of the Committee to Recall Judge Persky, Stanford Law School professor Michele Dauber said much of the committee’s money will soon be spent on circulating petitions — as soon as the Santa Clara County Registrar of Voters approves the language and format of the petitions.

Last year, Persky sentenced Stanford University student Brock Turner --- convicted of three felony counts of sexual assault --- to six months in jail and three years of probation. Dauber and recall supporters say Persky has a bias against women and favors male athletes.

The campaign’s documents, filed Monday with the registrar’s office, show that from Jan. 1 through June 30, 2017, the recall committee raised $120,624, while the Retain Judge Persky --- No Recall committee raised about half that amount, $63,910.

The recall campaign spent $64,308 in the first half of 2017 and had $353,726 on hand as of June 30. The retain campaign spent $73,199 during the six months and had an ending cash balance of $42,012.

To get the issue on the June 2018 ballot, the recall camp must collect 58,643 signatures of registered Santa Clara County voters. They have 160 days to do so --- but can begin only after the registrar certifies the ballot language and format as complying with the state Election Code.

When reached Tuesday afternoon, Dauber said she was driving to the registrar’s office with the second set of changes it had requested. Under the law, the registrar and the petitioner each have 10-day periods to make the petition conform.

Dauber expressed frustration at the requirements and delays, but said, “At this point, we are ready to get this on the streets. We have been complying with absolutely everything they have asked us to do.”

Philip Chantri, media officer for the registrar, said that March 9 is the last date by which either the registrar or the county board of supervisors can approve an issue to get it on the June 2018 ballot, so his office needs plenty of time before then to check every signature. If petitioners were able to start this week, they would have until mid-January to turn in the signatures.

To collect 90,000 signatures to ensure that 58,643 are valid, Dauber said, the recall campaign will pay some professional canvassers. But she added that the campaign already has 285 volunteers and will be holding more recruitment and training events.

Neither Persky nor his campaign treasurer could be reached for comment Tuesday. Persky has been on the bench since he was appointed by Gov. Gray Davis, a Democrat, in 2003.

The documents for the Retain Judge Persky campaign show that during the first half of 2017, it spent $30,000 on RDP Strategies of Scottsdale, Arizona, for consulting and polling. RDP is run by Brian Seitchik, who has directed or consulted on several Republican campaigns, including as the Arizona state director of Donald Trump’s presidential campaign.

The recall campaign’s donors have a variety of occupational backgrounds, while the retain committee’s contributors are nearly all lawyers and judges.

Originally published in the LA Daily Journal.

By James Getz

Read the original article here.